FREDERICH THE GREAT BRITISH SPY WAS THE FOUNDER OF THE COUNTER-REFORMATION KINGDOM OF PRUSSIA!!
 

Frederick was a GREAT British spy because he kept his true identity completely hidden.

Frederick the Great.
Frederick the Great
(1712–1786).

 

Hohenzollern King Frederick II was the most famous British spy to rule Prussia.

Like Hitler, he was a GREAT spy because he kept his true identify completely hidden!!

The Prussian dynasty was created by the British monarchy and the Bank of England as the spearhead of the Counter-Reformation in Germany.

 
Prussian coat of arms.
Prussian coat of arms.

In 1521, Pope Leo X conferred on King Henry VIII the pompous title Fideo Defensor or Defender of the (Latin) Faith for writing a Latin tome entitled Defence of the Seven Sacraments. That book, ghostwritten by Sir Thomas More, was a refutation of the Babylonian Captivity of the Church by Saint Martin Luther.

From that time onward, British spies began to infiltrate Germany in order to overthrow the blessed Reformation. One of the most infamous spies hired by Sir Thomas More was named Henry Phillips. Phillips befriended Saint William Tyndale and finally had him arrested in Belgium. Saint William Tyndale was burned at the stake for translating the Bible into English!!

The Prussian monarchy was founded by British spies in 1701. King Frederick I was its first king. Prior to that time, the rulers of the various German states were called ELECTORS.

The Vatican approves of one type of government ONLY: ABSOLUTE HEREDITARY MONARCHY....Any government based on elections, or the will of the people, she does her utmost to destroy!!

In order not to offend the Emperor of the Germans, Frederick I slyly referred to himself as king in Prussia.

Pope Benedict XIV (1740–1758) was the first Pope to recognize the title: King of Prussia, and the title was officially recognized by all the other nations in 1772.

King Frederick I (1657-1713).
King Frederick I (1657–1713).
King in Prussia from 1701 to 1713.
 

Hohenzollern King Frederick I was the founder of the Prussian monarchy.

Prior to his time, the heads of the various German states were called ELECTORS.

The Hohenzollern and the Hanover dynasty united at this time.

 
Sophia of Hanover (1688-1705). Queen consort from 1701 to 1705.
Sophia of Hanover (1688–1705).
Queen consort from 1701 to 1705.

Sophia Charlotte of Hanover was the queen consort of King Frederick. She was also the mother of his successor, Frederick William.

In 1714, her eldest brother, George Lewis, succeeded to the throne of Great Britain as King George I.

King George I (1660 - 1727).
King George I (1660–1727).
King from 1714 to 1727.

The Jesuit dominated British Hanoverian dynasty began with King George I in 1714.

Queen Elizabeth II is the current reigning member of the dynasty.

The name Hanover was changed to Windsor in 1917 to protect the guilty.

Queen Elizabeth II (b. 1926).
Queen Elizabeth II (b. 1926).

Queen Elizabeth II is descended from the Hanovers and her coins bear the pompous title Fidei Defensor (Defender of the (Latin) Faith).

Two of the cardinal doctrines of the "Christian" Faith are the Resurrection of Christ from the dead and Christian burial. Most of the Queen's subjects reject these cardinal doctrines of Christianity and embrace deadly Druid cremation instead.

Frederick William I (1688-1740).
Frederick William I (1688–1740).
Reigned from 1713 to 1740.
 

King Frederick William was the father of Frederick II, known in history as Frederick the Great.

He created a huge standing army and a regiment of GIANTS for his small kingdom.

 
Sophie-Dorothea (1687-1757).
Sophie-Dorothea (1687–1757).
Queen consort from 1713 to1740.

Frederick William's only passion was the military. He had a special regiment of very tall soldiers and even forced tall women to marry tall soldiers so they could breed more tall boys.

Potsdam giant soldier.
Potsdam giant soldier.
 

The king had a regiment of GIANT soldiers called the Potsdam Grenadiers.

He was 200 years ahead of Adolf Hitler in trying to create a super race!!

 
The king reviewing his giant soldiers.
The king reviewing his giant soldiers.

Here is a quote from a history of Prussia written in 1871:

By severe economy, small as were his realms, and limited as were his revenues, he raised an army of nearly a hundred thousand men. An imposing army seemed to be the great object of his ambition. He drilled his troops, personally, as troops were never drilled before. Possessing an iron constitution, and regardless of comfort himself, he had no mercy upon his soldiers. Thus he created the most powerful military engine, for its size, ever known upon earth. (Abbott, Prussia and the Franco-Prussian War, p. 12).

In 1740, King Frederick William I died and his son, Frederick II, assumed the Prussian throne.

Frederick the Great and the unholy Roman Empire
Frederick II is known in history as Frederick the Great. His ambition was to resurrect the unholy Roman Empire of Charlemagne:

His long-term goal was to raise Prussia to the status of a major power and attempt to revive the moribund German empire (the Holy Roman Empire) but with Protestant Prussia, not Roman Catholic Austria, as its natural leader. (Asprey, Frederick the Great, p. 149).

The Militia of Zeus and Minerva have always disguised their aims by using Protestant countries as their proxies to conquer their foes.

Frederick II (1712-1786).
Frederick II (1712–1786).
King from 1740 to1786.

 

Frederick had 2 passions: the military and increasing the size of his small kingdom.

He ignored his beautiful wife for all of their married life.

 
Elizabeth Christine (1715-1797). Queen consort from 1733 to 1786.
Elizabeth Christine (1715–1797).
Queen consort from 1733 to 1786.

Frederick was not interested in female sex and was only happy when he was aggrandizing his kingdom:

His nominal wife he recognized in public as queen, and ever treated her, when it was necessary that they should meet, with cold civility. Gradually these meetings grew rare, until, after three or four years, they ceased almost entirely. Frederick was anxious to embellish his reign with men of literary - and scientific celebrity. He established an academy of sciences, corresponded with distinguished scholars in other parts of Europe, and commenced correspondence and intimate friendship with Voltaire. (Abbott, Prussia and the Franco-Prussian War, p. 32).

He died without children and Frederick William II (the second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia) became king.

Frederick instigated the War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1847).

From 1740 to 1748, a worldwide conflict raged which has been called the War of the Austrian Succession. This war, involving all the powers of Europe, can be considered the first real global conflict.

Empress Maria Theresa (1717-1780).
Empress Maria Theresa (1717–1780).
Reigned from 1740 to 1765.
 

In 1740, 24 year old Maria Theresa became Empress of Austria.

Frederick saw a young and inexperienced woman on the throne, so he invaded the Austrian territory of Silesia.

 
Francis Stephen was the husband of Empress Maria Theresa.
Francis Stephen was the husband of Empress Maria Theresa.

Frederick saw a young and inexperienced woman on the throne so he was expecting a quick conquest of Silesia. Like Hitler's invasion of Russia, he underestimated his opponent.

All the participants of the War of the Austrian Succession. Blue: Austria, Great Britain, the United Provinces with allies. Green: Prussia, Spain, France with allies.
All the participants of the War of the Austrian Succession. Blue: Austria, Great Britain, the United Provinces with allies. Green: Prussia, Spain, France with allies.

Maria Theresa fought back like a tigress and the Silesian conquest developed into a world war:

But Maria Theresa developed character which alike surprised Frederick and all Europe. The chivalric spirit of the surrounding monarchies was enlisted in behalf of' a young queen thus unjustly assailed, and despoiled of an important province of her realms. The preparations which Maria Theresa made to regain her lost possessions induced Frederick to send an army of sixty thousand men into Silesia to hold firmly his conquest. A terrible war was the consequence–a war in which nearly all the nations of Europe became involved, and which extended even to the distant colonial possessions of England and France. Millions of money were expended, hundreds of thousands of lives sacrificed, cities sacked, and villages burned; while an amount of misery was spread through countless homes which no imagination can gauge. (Abbott, Prussia and the Franco-Prussian War, pp. 34-35).

After 8 years of bitter conflict, a truce was finally signed in 1748. Under the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, Prussia was allowed to hold on to the conquered territory of Silesia.

Empress Maria Theresa was still determined to get back Silesia and this led to the second worldwide conflict called the Seven Years' War.

Frederick instigated The Seven Years War (1756–1763).

After the conquest of Silesia, Frederick had time to rebuild his army and prepare for the next conflict called the Seven Years' War:

Maria Theresa, ever anxious to regain Silesia, entered, with that object in view, into a secret alliance with Elizabeth, Empress of Russia, and with Augustus III. of Poland. Both Elizabeth and Maria Theresa entertained a very strong personal dislike for Frederick. The Marchioness of Pompadour, who ruled France, had considered herself insulted by the sarcasms of his Prussian majesty. Anxious for revenge, she also joined the alliance. It so chanced, at that time, that three women ruled Continental Europe. These three women were arrayed against Frederick. Thus, in addition to the important diplomatic issues which were involved, personal pique envenomed the conflict. There were also many rumors that Frederick was contemplating additional conquests. Frederick, by bribery, became acquainted with the plan of the coalition. It was nothing less than taking possession of Prussia, and essentially dividing it between them; leaving to their vanquished foe, perhaps, a small duchy or marquisate. The king resolved to anticipate his foes, and to strike them before they had begun to move. France was at that time at war with England, and hoped to take Hanover. This led the British court, trembling for its Continental possession, to enter into a reluctant and inefficient alliance with Prussia. Thus commenced the Seven Years' War. (Abbott, Prussia and the Franco-Prussian War, pp. 43-44).

This conflict was called the French and Indian War in the British colonies and George Washington first saw action during the war.

All the participants of the Seven Years' War. Blue: Great Britain, Prussia, Portugal with allies. Green: France, Spain, Austria, Russia, Sweden with allies.
All the participants of the Seven Years' War. Blue: Great Britain, Prussia, Portugal with allies. Green: France, Spain, Austria, Russia, Sweden with allies.

The conflict ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763. Prussia was allowed to hold Silesia. France was ejected from the New World, and the Louisiana Territory handed over to Spain.

This conflict set the stage for the American Revolution because the British colonists were forbidden to settle west of the Allegheny Mountains.

In 1763, after the end of the devastating Seven Years' War, most of the monarchs of Europe began to pressure Pope Clement XIII to outlaw the Jesuit firebrands. The Pope feared for his life and was not anxious to meet St. Peter. Finally in 1773, Pope Clement XIV took the fateful step and banned them permanently and perpetually. The Bull of Suppression was put into effect in Austria, France, Spain, Portugal, and Italy.

Frederick gave those banned firebrands a sanctuary in his kingdom:

So much has been written on the conduct of Frederick the Great and Catherine in patronising the Jesuits that we do not share the astonishment of contemporaries. In his correspondence with the free thinker D'Alembert at Paris, Frederick lightly advances one reason after another for his action. He scouted D'Alembert's warnings. The Pope had "pared the claws" of the dangerous animals; he had "cut off the tails of the foxes," and they could not again carry torches into the cornfields of the Philistines. On the other hand, they were excellent teachers, and it was immaterial to Frederick what orders the Pope gave about their costume and domestic arrangements. Pressed more seriously, he pleaded that when he annexed Silesia he had solemnly pledged himself to respect the religious status quo, and he was bound in honour to leave the Jesuits there, since they were part of the situation he had sworn to respect. (McCabe, A Candid History of the Jesuits, pp. 364-365).

Catherine II of Russia also protected them and Hitler repaid that kindness by invading Russia in 1941.
A Prussian officer drilled George Washington's army!!

A Prussian military officer named Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben drilled George Washington's army at valley forge. The colonists were crack shots with a gun and that was all that was necessary to be a good soldier in the New World.

Baron von Steuben (1730 -1794).
Baron von Steuben
(1730–1794).
 

Baron von Steuben drilled Washington's troops at valley forge.

He was trying to turn them into a European style army which was a total waste of time for the sharpshooters.

Of course, the British knew every move that Washington made during the entire Revolutionary War.

 
George Washington at Valley Forge.
George Washington
at Valley Forge.

The British knew every move that the Continental Army made during the Revolutionary War. Their spies had saturated the Colonies long before the Boston Tea Party. George Washington would be very familiar with British espionage because he was a scout in the British army. Stranger still, the British never touched George Washington's vast estate at Mount Vernon.

The Franco-Prussian War of 1870

The relentless Prussian drive to expand began in earnest in 1862 when absolute autocrat King William I appointed Bismarck his prime minister.

William I (1797-1888).
William I (1797–1888).
King from 1861 to 1871.
Kaiser from 1871 to 1888.
 

Absolute autocrat King William I appointed Bismarck his prime minister in 1862.

The relentless Prussian drive to expand began again in earnest.

Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
Otto von Bismarck (1815–1898).
Prime minister from 1862 to 1871.

Chancellor from 1871 to 1890.

In 1866, Prussia defeated Austria at the Battle of Sadowa. The Prussians studied the U.S. Civil War carefully and they implemented the use of the telegraph and railroads for their lightning victory over the Austrians.

France was provoked into a suicidal war with Prussia when Bismarck nominated Prince Leopold of Hohenzollern for the vacant Spanish throne.

Prince Leopold of Hohenzollern
Prince Leopold of Hohenzollern
(1835–1905).
 
Bismarck offered Prince Leopold of Hohenzollern the vacant Spanish throne.

The French were alarmed, as this would resurrect the unholy Roman Empire of Charlemagne.

 
Princess Antónia (1845-1913),
Princess Antónia (1845–1913),
wife of Prince Leopold.

France was at the mercy of Prussia at that time because Prussia controlled the forts on BOTH banks of the Rhine:

Such was the state of affairs when the sagacious Bismarck endeavored to place Leopold of Hohenzollern upon the throne of Spain. Leopold was a prince of one of the most important principalities of Prussia, a near relative of the royal family, and a colonel in the Prussian army. The successful accomplishment of this feat would indeed have been the revival of the empire of Charlemagne; Spain would have been but a province of the great German Empire, submissive to the crown of Prussia; France would have been quite at the mercy of this gigantic power. And yet it was very adroitly done. (Abbott, Prussia and the Franco-Prussian War, pp. 193-194).

Napoleon's slogan was not ON TO BERLIN but on to the RHINE River because that was the natural defensible boundary between the two countries.

Again, the Prussians used the telegraph and railroad to mass millions of troops quickly for the invasion. The French were overwhelmed by this forerunner of the blitzkrieg and the Prussians were in Paris by January, 1871.

A completely unexpected result of the Franco-Prussian War was the liberation of Rome.

Liberating general Raffaele Cadorna.
Liberating general Raffaele Cadorna.

 

Bismarck and the British never expected that the liberation of Rome would result from his invasion of France.

He was trying to resurrect the unholy Roman Empire of Charlemagne.

 
Italian troops entering Rome at Porta Pia.
Italian troops entering Rome at Porta Pia.

The British Jesuits blundered badly by this invasion. It led to the totally unforeseen consequences of the liberation of Rome. It was a blunder like the spinning earth of Jesuit Galileo.

Another Prussian goal of the invasion was the takeover of Holland so that Prussia could become a naval rival to Great Britain:

It is said that ambition grows with what it feeds upon. Prussia, instead of being satiated with the enormous acquisitions which she had made, was supposed to be looking around for new conquests. The French "Journal Officiel" says,—
"No one can ignore the ambitious designs of Prussia against Holland. Bismarck wishes that little nation to submit, as the Danish duchies were forced to submit. He wished to render Holland a naval State of the North German Confederation. But for the stand taken by France, Prussian policy would have proved fatal to the independence of the Netherlands." (Abbott, Prussia and the Franco-Prussian War, p. 193).

The war ended with complete military humiliation for France but one good result was the overthrow of the monarchy and the declaration of the Third French Republic.

WWI was an attempt to resurrect the unholy Roman Empire!!

After the Franco-Prussian War, united Germany under Prussia became the most powerful nation in Europe. King William I now became Emperor or Kaiser William.

When Kaiser William died in 1888, his son Frederick succeeded him as Kaiser. Frederick was a liberal and totally opposed to the "blood and iron" regime of Bismarck.

Kaiser Frederick III (1831-1888).
Kaiser Frederick III (1831–1888).
Reigned for only 99 days.

 

Emperor Frederick III was married to the eldest daughter of Queen Victoria, thus cementing an alliance of peace and friendship between Great Britain and the German Empire.

After reigning for only 99 days, Frederick died of throat cancer!!

 
Princess Victoria (1840-1901).
Princess Victoria (1840–1901).
Wife of Emperor Frederick III.

Kaiser Frederick III had nothing in common with "Blood and Iron" Bismarck so he had a timely demise to make way for his son, William II, the notorious WWI Kaiser.

Kaiser William II (1859-1941).
Kaiser William II (1859–1941).
Reigned from 1888 to 1918.
 

The militant Kaiser William II reigned in the place of his murdered father.

With British help, he was determined to resurrect the unholy Roman Empire of Charlemagne!!

 
Massive German casualties at the battle of Verdun. Europe had not seen such a bloody conflict since the 30 Years' War.
Massive German casualties at the battle of Verdun. Europe had not seen such a bloody conflict since the 30 Years' War.

The war turned out to be a disaster for the Kaiser and he abdicated on November 9, 1918.

The Treaty of Versailles ending the war was signed on June 28,1919.

Total casualties of World War I amounted to 10 million dead and 20 million wounded worldwide. If we include the Spanish flu, which happened shortly thereafter, the figure is a staggering 30 to 50 million killed!!

WWII was an attempt to resurrect the unholy Roman Empire!!

German Führer Adolf Hitler was almost a clone of King Frederick II. Both men were British spies determined to undo the blessed Reformation.

Like Frederick, Hitler was looking for a miracle to save him from a Russian invasion of Berlin.

The Jesuits did succeed in poisoning Russian Empress Elizabeth, and thus saving Prussia, but MI6 was unable to kill Stalin.

MI6 had more success with President Roosevelt, but his death did not save Hitler from final defeat.

Adolf Hitler (1889-1945).
Adolf Hitler (1889–1962).
Führer from 1933 to 1945.
 

British spy King Frederick II was the role model for MI6 Adolf Hitler.

In their lust for conquest, both men started a world war.

Minister for Propaganda Joseph Goebbels presented Hitler with a portrait of his hero Frederick II on his 50th birthday.

 

Hitler was presented with a portrait of
his hero on his 50th birthday.

Albert Speer was the architect of Hitler's world capital. Its crowning glory was to be the Volkshalle (People's Hall) which was modeled on the Pantheon at Rome.

The planned world capital of Germania.
The planned world capital
of Germania.
 

Führer Hitler tried to resurrect the unholy Roman Empire of Charlemagne, with Berlin as the world capital.

With Russia defeated, Germany was to have hegemony in Europe, with Britannia misruling the waves!!

 

 
The Volkshalle was modelled after the
The Volkshalle was modelled after the
Pantheon at Rome.

Britain and Germany were to divide up the world between them, with Germany ruling Europe, and Britannia misruling the waves. To eliminate her New World rival, Britain planned on starting a new civil war from her base in Canada.

Hitler's fatal mistake was underestimating Russia. Instead of Hitler entering Moscow, the Russians entered Berlin in 1945, and that was the end of Hitler's Third Reich.

Total casualties of the British Jesuit instigated World War II amounted to about 100 million dead. 27 million Russians perished in the most terrible conflagration in the history of the world.

Hitler's legacy still lives in the British Empire state of "Israel" and the Cold War which never ended.

When will the 4th British Reich be resurrected??

The Papal States and the unholy Roman Empire are intimately connected. Both began about the same time.

The real Roman Emperor in Constantinople was supplanted by the creation of this counterfeit "Roman Empire" in the West.

King Pepin (714-768).
King Pepin (714–768).
King of the Franks from 752 to 768.
 

Pepin gave the Pope the Papal States in 755.

His son Charlemagne was crowned unholy Roman emperor by the Pope on December 25, 800.

This was the beginning of the 1st Reich.

 

 
Charlemagne (742-814).
Charlemagne (742–814).
Unholy Roman emperor from 800 to 814.

If we add 1260 years to 755 it ends in the fateful year 2015 and hopefully the Fall of the British Empire and the Papacy.

The 1st Reich received a mighty blow from Saint Martin Luther on October 31, 1517. After the 30 Years' War, some of the electors had to be chosen from Protestant states and that was completely anathema to the Jesuits.

It was officially abolished by Napoleon Bonaparte on August 6, 1806.

The 2nd Reich began in 1871, and lasted to the defeat of Germany in 1918.

The 3rd Reich was Hitler's dictatorship or Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945.

If Hitler had no heirs a member of the Hohenzollern dynasty would have succeeded him with the title: "Holy" Roman Emperor....Members of that unholy dynasty still survive up to this day!!


Vital Links

 


References

Abbott, S. C. Prussia and the Franco-Prussian War, B. B. Russell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1872.

Asprey, Robert B. Frederick the Great: The Magnificent Enigma. Ticknor & Fields, New York, 1986.

Hoensbroech, Paul von. Fourteen Years a Jesuit (volume I). Cassell & Company, London & New York, 1911.

Hoensbroech, Paul von. Fourteen Years a Jesuit (volume 2). Cassell & Company, London & New York, 1911.

McCabe, Joseph. A Candid History of the Jesuits. G. P. Putman's Sons, New York, 1913.

Ryan John A. The State and the Church, The Macmillian Co., New York, 1924.


Copyright © 2013 by Patrick Scrivener


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